Home / Auction & Collectibles / 10 highly lucrative collectibles

10 highly lucrative collectibles

collectibles aha 311 300x214 10 highly lucrative collectiblesJuly 31(MSN Money) — Hoping to get big money for your baseball cards and stamp collection? Think again. Those once-popular collector items are no longer in very high demand. Instead you might consider financial securities from pre-communist China, or perhaps railroad memorabilia? Collectors pay big for those kinds of items today, says Paul Fraser, owner of Paul Fraser Collectibles, which buys and sells rare items. Sales of collectibles are rising, up 15 percent last year on eBay to $2.7 billion, for example. Here’s a look at some of the most lucrative kinds of collectibles, according to WhatSellsBest.com, a site that monitors millions of auction items worldwide.

A new era for collectibles

Hoping to get big money for your baseball cards and stamp collection? Think again. Those once-popular collector items are no longer in very high demand. Instead you might consider financial securities from pre-communist China, or perhaps railroad memorabilia? Collectors pay big for those kinds of items today, says Paul Fraser, owner of Paul Fraser Collectibles, which buys and sells rare items. Sales of collectibles are rising, up 15 percent last year on eBay to $2.7 billion, for example. Here’s a look at some of the most lucrative kinds of collectibles, according to WhatSellsBest.com, a site that monitors millions of auction items worldwide.

Rare records

What makes one album worth a few dollars while others bring thousands of dollars? In the vinyl record world, it all comes down to availability — or lack thereof.

In one recent example, a promotional record for the Beatles single “Love Me Do” sold for $10,974 on eBay.

The Beatles record had an unusual error: the misspelling of Paul McCartney’s last name as “McArtney.” Those kinds of rarities translate to higher value in the collecting world, says Scott Neuman, president of ForeverVinyl.com, a record appraiser in Toms River, N.J.

Similarly a 45 rpm single of the Rolling Stones’ “Street Fighting Man” with the original sleeve sold for $10,000. The sleeve, showing a controversial image of a man being beaten by police, was later replaced with a picture of the band.

Collectors also clamor over acetate records or a tester recordings made before a vinyl pressing. People might pay up to $70,000 for them, depending on the artist. Typically fewer than a dozen of the testers were pressed, mainly for band members, recording engineers or record company archives. “They’re degradable and wear out over time, and pieces of them can chip off,” says Neuman. “But the sound quality is amazing.”

Action Figures

Who would think that a $3 action figure bought in 1985 would sell for thousands of dollars today? That was the case for a 1985 Kenner action figure of Boba Fett, based on the animated “Star Wars: Droids” television show that lasted only one season. It sold for $10,200 on Ebay.

Those pricey sales of rare action figures from the “Star Wars” franchise are becoming more common. Values have soared in just the past six to eight months, says Brian Semling, owner of Brian’s Toys, an online Star Wars toys and collectibles store. A big driver: Disney’s $4.05 billion acquisition of Lucasfilm last fall, and fan anticipation of a new round of Star Wars movies.

“It has put new energy into the franchise,” says Semling. Case in point: he recently sold a vintage Darth Vader action figure for $30,000 on eBay. With its telescoping light saber, it was the first version of the Darth Vader toy and one of only eight known in the world.

Toy Mechanical Bank

Made in the 1880s, mechanical banks were intended to teach children the importance of saving their coins. But 130 years later, the banks are driving far bigger financial decisions. This Strauss Little Jocko tin musical mechanical bank sold for a $10,781 on eBay in May.

Banks made from tin are fragile, so those still around and in great condition are a rare find. They can fetch up to $100,000, says Michael Bertoia, whose family business Bertoia Auctions specializes in mechanical banks.

Collectors pay even more for banks made from cast iron. Sturdier, they are usually more ornate and reflect a higher craftsmanship. They can sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Rare Railroad Lantern

Sheriff Ron Krupa of Sedgwick County, Kan., regularly scours estate sales for old bottles and glass and pottery to add to his personal collections. Last spring, he stumbled upon an important find: a 15-inch tall railroad lantern. He thought it was neat and bought it for less than $100.

Immediately upon leaving the estate sale, a fellow shopper offered him $10,000 for it. He turned down the offer and contacted an appraiser, who told him it was an extremely rare, original Santa Fe Railroad lantern with an embossed Santa Fe Sapphire Globe. One of only seven known copies in the world, it had languished in a storage unit for 40 years.

When Krupa put the lantern on eBay, bidders drove up the price to $11,211. The winner turned out to be the same appraiser who told Krupa what he owned. “The lantern has become a legend in Wichita,” says Krupa’s wife, Anne.

SOURCE

Share your opinion below.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Protected by WP Anti Spam

Scroll To Top
Email
Print